Vaccinations

Is your pet vaccinated?

There is no doubt that vaccinations are vital to protect your pet’s health. In dogs, for example, they can prevent potentially serious canine diseases like distemper, rabies and hepatitis.

Many vaccines can be given to pets as young as 7 weeks old, so talk to us about setting up the best vaccination schedule for your puppy, dog, cat, kitten or rabbit.

A vaccination is quite possibly the best gift you could ever give your pet. Below are links that provide further details into why it is so essential not only to vaccinate but to keep your pet’s vaccinations up to date.

Dog & Puppy Vaccinations

When should I vaccinate my puppy?

The first injection is administered at a minimum of 7 weeks old. The second injection is 2 to 4 weeks after. Puppies should be a minimum of 10 weeks old when the second vaccine is administered. 

 

Why should I vaccinate my dog?

Vaccination allows your dog to develop immunity to dangerous diseases. This means that if your dog comes into contact with a disease, it will be protected and will not get ill. If your dog is not protected by vaccination they are at risk of catching dangerous diseases that will put his or her life at risk. Puppies are particularly vulnerable because their bodies are not yet fully developed but older dogs, too, need the protection that regular booster vaccinations provide.

 

How do I get my dog or puppy vaccinated?

If you bring your dog to the Jollyes Community Pet Clinic, our vet will examine your pet to check that it he or she is healthy prior to vaccination. This is important as vaccines are often less effective in an unhealthy dog. They will advise you on which vaccinations are appropriate depending on your dog’s age and lifestyle.

 

How often will my dog need vaccinating?

Your dog or puppy will first require a primary course of vaccinations, which is usually two vaccinations but may be three depending on the type of vaccine and the disease profile in your area. Puppies will not be fully protected by their vaccinations until approximately two weeks after the second vaccine; our vets at your local Community Pet Clinic can advise you on the exact timings and precisely when your puppy is fully protected by its vaccinations.

 

VaccinationPrice
Primary Course First £33.00
Primary Course Second FREE*
Annual Booster £25.00
Kennel Cough Vaccination £14.00
Annual Booster & Kennel Cough £32.00
Vaccination For Life £89.00

*Offer only applies on the condition that initial treatment was administered by the Community Pet Clinic. Otherwise charge of treatment will be £20. 


Rabies Vaccination - Pets must be a minimum age of 12 weeks to receive the Rabies vaccination and are not allowed to travel until 21 days post vaccination.

VaccinationPrice
Rabies £35.00
Cat & Kitten Vaccinations

When should i vaccinate my kitten?

Core vaccinations are first given at 9 weeks of age. The second vaccination is at a minimum age of 12 weeks, 3-4 weeks from the first vaccination.

 

Why should I vaccinate my cat? 

Vaccination allows your cat to develop immunity to dangerous diseases, so giving it the best possible protection should it come into contact with a disease. If your cat is not protected by vaccination there is a risk of catching diseases such as cat flu and Feline leukaemia virus.

 

How do I get my cat vaccinated?

You can bring your cat to Jollyes Community Pet Clinic or any vet to get vaccinated. We will need to examine your cat to check that it is healthy and then advise you as to which vaccinations your cat needs. This will depend on factors such as your cat’s age, lifestyle and life history.

 

How often does my cat need vaccinating?

If your cat or kitten has not had any vaccinations before, it will need a first round or ‘primary course’ of vaccinations. This is usually two vaccinations but may be three depending on the type of vaccine and the disease profile for your area.

Because your cat will not protected by the vaccine until a few weeks after the primary course, you will be advised as to exactly how long it will take before the vaccination becomes effective. This will depend on the particular type of vaccine administered. After the primary course your cat will require boosters every year. It is important to keep up to date with the boosters as your cat gets older. Cats should not be vaccinated when pregnant.

 

Cat Vaccination LEUKOCELL 2 (preventing persistent viremia, lymphoid tumors caused by feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and diseases associated with FeLV infection) From 9 weeks of age:

VaccinationPrice
Primary Course First £33.00
Primary Course Second FREE*
Annual Booster £25.00
Vaccination For Life £89.00

*Offer only applies on the condition that initial treatment was administered by the Community Pet Clinic. Otherwise charge of treatment will be £20. 

 

Cat Vaccination Verifel CVR (Fights against feline enteritis - panleucopaenia virus FPV, feline rhinotracheitis virus FVR and live attenuated feline calicivirus FCV) From 9 weeks of age:

VaccinationPrice
Primary Course First £30.00
Primary Course Second FREE*
Annual Booster

£25.00

Vaccination For Life

£89.00

*Offer only applies on the condition that initial treatment was administered by the Community Pet Clinic. Otherwise charge of treatment will be £25.00 

 

Rabies Vaccination - Pets must be a minimum age of 12 weeks to receive the Rabies vaccination and are not allowed to travel until 21 days post vaccination.

VaccinationPrice
Rabies £35.00
Rabbit Vaccinations

Rabbit Vaccinations 

Rabbits need vaccinations to prevent/protect against myxomatosis and Rabbit (Viral) Haemorrhagic Disease (R(V)HD) which cause intense suffering to rabbits. Single vaccines against myxomatosis and RHD cannot be given simultaneously. Myxomatosis boosters are needed every six months.


Why should I vaccinate my rabbit? 

Vaccination allows your rabbit to develop immunity to dangerous diseases. This protects them from contracting the diseases and so stops them becoming ill.


How do I get my rabbit vaccinated?

We will need to examine your rabbit to check that it is healthy prior to vaccination. We will advise you on which vaccinations are appropriate for your rabbit depending on your rabbit’s age, lifestyle and life history.


What should my rabbit be vaccinated against?

Rabbits who have not been vaccinated run the risk of contracting one of two potential fatal infectious diseases: myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD). Even rabbits kept indoors run the risk of being bitten by a mosquito or flea carrying this disease. You can protect your rabbit from both of these diseases with a combined vaccine administered at the Community Pet Clinic.


How often will my rabbit need vaccinating?

Rabbits must be over the age of 5 weeks before they have their vaccination. It is a one vaccine course with boosters yearly. The first vaccination should be given at about 5 to 8 weeks of age. Before this age the kitten is protected by its mother’s immunity, as long as the mother was herself vaccinated. Rabbits will then need vaccinating every year in most areas. Unfortunately the two vaccines that rabbits require cannot be administered together and should be given 14 days apart. In some areas where myxomatosis is particularly common, rabbits should be vaccinated every six months, but do ask your vet for advice on the disease profile in your local area.


Rabies vaccinations can only be administered at the minimum age of 12 weeks and pets are not allowed to travel until 21 days post vaccination.

VaccinationPrice
Myxamatosis & Haemorrhagic  £30.00
Vaccination For Life £89.00
Rabies £35.00